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Mr. Popper’s Penguins


Please, pardon me for my partial absence. I have returned with a paltry attempt at a Mr. Popper’s Penguins periodical and a word of caution for having preconceived notions about these penguins.

Grade:

Mr. Popper (Jim Carrey) receives a present from his global pioneer papa in the form of penguins. As he tries to deal with the penguins, he also juggles a stressful job—during the principal deal of his career, of course—and his shaky relationship with his ex-wife, Amanda (Carla Gugino), and his kids.

Carrey plays Popper practically the same as in Perjurer, Perjurer, but solely for kids here. His profession pedals his life from sun up to sun down. He even eagerly proclaims, “Monday. Thank God!”—a Pyramid clue for “things people have never proclaimed.” Regardless, Carrey does produce some laughs with his performance.

The tale is childish in personality, so presuming anything causing personal reflection is more than slightly imprudent on your part. Precursory perceptions would predict Popper’s to be a piss-poor movie, but in practice we get mediocre fun for people of all ages. Characters like Gugino’s are potentially pointless and the story is predictable in all facets. Who cares?

During the dull moments, the captivating aspects of the picture are the penguins. Particular parts have actual penguins, while others portray CGI versions. Yet, it is hard to precisely pick out which penguins are the actual Gentoo opposed to virtual. This is perhaps in part due to photoshopped actual penguins to blend the images to make the disparity less palpable. It presents some perplexity, but not enough to change your perception of the film.

Pious pontificators will proudly proclaim, “Mr. Popper’s Penguins is a poorly presented motion picture.” Perhaps, but pertaining to products of procreation, Popper’s is perfectly applicable. For persons of more prominent positions and ages, it’s a predictably passable picture*.

*Basically, I’m saying MPP is not as bad as you’d expect if you just let go for a bit.

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