Advertisements

The B…B…Brilliance of The King’s Speech


kings speech poster

I don’t need to tell you of how brilliant The King’s Speech is. How beautifully it captures a royal’s struggle, makes him human. How the excellent screenplay—coupled with deliberate, careful editing—pushes the story along in a breezy, natural way. How each and every scene conveys an important message or emotion that is vital to the tale.

I don’t need to tell you how Colin Firth immerses himself in a role that requires something more challenging than a foreign accent: a stammer. A stammer so debilitating it shakes a prince to his core, unable to perform the simple task of completing a sentence.

AI don’t need to tell you that the speech therapy shown is linguistically intriguing. The farfetched schemes used to solve a problem instead of focusing on the articulation. Sure enough, Geoffrey Rush’s humble Lionel Logue discovers the stammer arises from a psychological block—a sort of mental aversion to speaking, if you will—further implanting the idea of the royal family consisting normal people like you and me. There is pressure for greatness everywhere, especially at the highest parts of society.

I don’t need to tell you that Helena Bonham Carter—when she isn’t embracing her eccentricities in her husband’s films—is an incredibly skilled actress. This last one needs to be emphasized more often actually; she’s been nominated for two Academy Awards and starred in various other films that deserve our praise (see: Conversations with Other Women). Her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth as a supportive but stern wife is the glue that keeps the film grounded from being too pitiable.

Really, I shouldn’t have to tell you anything about the best film from 2010. It speaks for itself…and very eloquently I might add.

Advertisements
  1. I love that film, and think it’s one of Firth’s finest moments. I remember reading somewhere that one of the groups that represent stutterers praised the honest portrayal you see in this and how it’s the best on screen of the issue yet.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Let me know what you think

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: